Bombshell: WHO Releases Plan for Global Digital Vaccine Passports Funded by Bill Gates & Rockefeller Foundation

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The World Health Organization (WHO) has released a proposal backed by two major globalist organizations that serves as a blueprint for governments to implement a worldwide vaccine passport verification system.

Alex Jones breaks down the WHO document:

The document, called “Digital Documentation of COVID-19 Certificates: Vaccination Status,” funded by none other than the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Rockefeller foundation, describes the technical guidance for governments to roll out the program to usher in a global digital ID — in the name of COVID, of course.

“This document lays out an approach for creating a signed digital version of a vaccination record for COVID-19 based on a core data set of key information to be recorded, and an approach for the digital signature. The document leverages existing free and open standards, and is driven by the ethics, use cases and requirements for Digital Documentation of COVID-19 Certificates: Vaccination Status (DDCC:VS).”

“This document is therefore software-agnostic and provides a starting point for Member States to design, develop and deploy a DDCC:VS solution for national use in whichever format best suits their needs (e.g. a paper card with a one-dimensional [1D] barcode or QR code stickers, or a fully functioning smartphone application developed internationally or locally).”

“The primary target audience of this document is national authorities tasked with creating or overseeing the development of a digital vaccination certificate solution for COVID-19. The document may also be useful to government partners such as local businesses, international organizations, non- governmental organizations and trade associations, that may be required to support Member States in developing or deploying a DDCC:VS solution.”

The DDCC:VS is meant for use at schools, at work, for international travel, and for contact tracing initiatives.

The document also shows its proposed vaccine passport template, with a QR code featured on the front, but further in the app shows personal information about the number of vaccines received.

A similar vaccine passport project in the works, called CommonPass, is also backed by the Rockefeller Foundation and the World Economic Forum (WEF).

It’s notable how the only groups actively pushing for global vaccine passports are also the main proponents of the so-called Great Reset, a post-human plan outlined by WEF founder Klaus Schwab which seeks to deindustrialize the West, abolish private property, introduce biometric surveillance, and move humanity to a diet of bugs in the name of fighting climate change.

Read the WHO document here.

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The different types of COVID-19 vaccines

This article is part of a series of explainers on vaccine development and distribution. Learn more about vaccines – from how they work and how they’re made to ensuring safety and equitable access – in WHO’s Vaccines Explained series.

As of December 2020, there are over 200 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 being developed. Of these, at least 52 candidate vaccines are in human trials. There are several others currently in phase I/II, which will enter phase III in the coming months (for more information on the clinical trial phases, see part three of our Vaccine Explained series).

Why are there so many vaccines in development?

Typically, many vaccine candidates will be evaluated before any are found to be both safe and effective. For example, of all the vaccines that are studied in the lab and laboratory animals, roughly 7 out of every 100 will be considered good enough to move into clinical trials in humans. Of the vaccines that do make it to clinical trials, just one in five is successful. Having lots of different vaccines in development increases the chances that there will be one or more successful vaccines that will be shown to be safe and efficacious for the intended prioritized populations.

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The different types of vaccines

There are three main approaches to designing a vaccine. Their differences lie in whether they use a whole virus or bacterium; just the parts of the germ that triggers the immune system; or just the genetic material that provides the instructions for making specific proteins and not the whole virus.

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The whole-microbe approach

Inactivated vaccine

The first way to make a vaccine is to take the disease-carrying virus or bacterium, or one very similar to it, and inactivate or kill it using chemicals, heat or radiation. This approach uses technology that’s been proven to work in people – this is the way the flu and polio vaccines are made – and vaccines can be manufactured on a reasonable scale. 

However, it requires special laboratory facilities to grow the virus or bacterium safely, can have a relatively long production time, and will likely require two or three doses to be administered.

Live-attenuated vaccine

A live-attenuated vaccine uses a living but weakened version of the virus or one that’s very similar. The measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine and the chickenpox and shingles vaccine are examples of this type of vaccine. This approach uses similar technology to the inactivated vaccine and can be manufactured at scale. However, vaccines like this may not be suitable for people with compromised immune systems.

Viral vector vaccine

This type of vaccine uses a safe virus to deliver specific sub-parts – called proteins – of the germ of interest so that it can trigger an immune response without causing disease. To do this, the instructions for making particular parts of the pathogen of interest are inserted into a safe virus. The safe virus then serves as a platform or vector to deliver the protein into the body.  The protein triggers the immune response. The Ebola vaccine is a viral vector vaccine and this type can be developed rapidly.

The subunit approach

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A subunit vaccine is one that only uses the very specific parts (the subunits) of a virus or bacterium that the immune system needs to recognize. It doesn’t contain the whole microbe or use a safe virus as a vector. The subunits may be proteins or sugars. Most of the vaccines on the childhood schedule are subunit vaccines, protecting people from diseases such as whooping cough, tetanus, diphtheria and meningococcal meningitis.

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The genetic approach (nucleic acid vaccine)

Unlike vaccine approaches that use either a weakened or dead whole microbe or parts of one, a nucleic acid vaccine just uses a section of genetic material that provides the instructions for specific proteins, not the whole microbe. DNA and RNA are the instructions our cells use to make proteins. In our cells, DNA is first turned into messenger RNA, which is then used as the blueprint to make specific proteins. 

Vaccines Topics Four images working 05 DNA RNA v2

A nucleic acid vaccine delivers a specific set of instructions to our cells, either as DNA or mRNA, for them to make the specific protein that we want our immune system to recognize and respond to. 

The nucleic acid approach is a new way of developing vaccines. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, none had yet been through the full approvals process for use in humans, though some DNA vaccines, including for particular cancers, were undergoing human trials. Because of the pandemic, research in this area has progressed very fast and some mRNA vaccines for COVID-19 are getting emergency use authorization, which means they can now be given to people beyond using them only in clinical trials.

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How are vaccines developed?

Most vaccines have been in use for decades, with millions of people receiving them safely every year. As with all medicines, every vaccine must go through extensive and rigorous testing to ensure it is safe before it can be introduced in a country’s vaccine programme. 

Each vaccine under development must first undergo screenings and evaluations to determine which antigen should be used to invoke an immune response. This preclinical phase is done without testing on humans. An experimental vaccine is first tested in animals to evaluate its safety and potential to prevent disease.

If the vaccine triggers an immune response, it is then tested in human clinical trials in three phases.

Phase 1

The vaccine is given to a small number of volunteers to assess its safety, confirm it generates an immune response, and determine the right dosage. Generally in this phase vaccines are tested in young, healthy adult volunteers.

Phase 2

The vaccine is then given to several hundred volunteers to further assess its safety and ability to generate an immune response. Participants in this phase have the same characteristics (such as age, sex) as the people for whom the vaccine is intended. There are usually multiple trials in this phase to evaluate various age groups and different formulations of the vaccine. A group that did not get the vaccine is usually included in phase as a comparator group to determine whether the changes in the vaccinated group are attributed to the vaccine, or have happened by chance. 

Phase 3

The vaccine is next given to thousands of volunteers – and compared to a similar group of people who didn’t get the vaccine, but received a comparator product – to determine if the vaccine is effective against the disease it is designed to protect against and to study its safety in a much larger group of people. Most of the time phase three trials are conducted across multiple countries and multiple sites within a country to assure the findings of the vaccine performance apply to many different populations. 

During phase two and phase three trials, the volunteers and the scientists conducting the study are shielded from knowing which volunteers had received the vaccine being tested or the comparator product. This is called “blinding” and is necessary to assure that neither the volunteers nor the scientists are influenced in their assessment of safety or effectiveness by knowing who got which product. After the trial is over and all the results are finalized, the volunteers and the trial scientists are informed who received the vaccine and who received the comparator.

Topic Two CIinical Trials_Static 29 Oct

When the results of all these clinical trials are available, a series of steps is required, including reviews of efficacy and safety for regulatory and public health policy approvals. Officials in each country closely review the study data and decide whether to authorize the vaccine for use. A vaccine must be proven to be safe and effective across a broad population before it will be approved and introduced into a national immunization programme. The bar for vaccine safety and efficacy is extremely high, recognizing that vaccines are given to people who are otherwise healthy and specifically free from the illness. 

Further monitoring takes place in an ongoing way after the vaccine is introduced. There are systems to monitor the safety and effectiveness of all vaccines. This enables scientists to keep track of vaccine impact and safety even as they are used in a large number of people, over a long time frame.  These data are used to adjust the policies for vaccine use to optimize their impact, and they also allow the vaccine to be safely tracked throughout its use. 

Once a vaccine is in use, it must be continuously monitored to make sure it continues to be safe.

 
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Preservatives

Preservatives prevent the vaccine from becoming contaminated once the vial has been opened, if it will be used for vaccinating more than one person. Some vaccines don’t have preservatives because they are stored in one-dose vials and are discarded after the single dose is administered. The most commonly used preservative is 2-phenoxyethanol. It has been used for many years in a number of vaccines, is used in a range of baby care products and is safe for use in vaccines, as it has little toxicity in humans.

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How are vaccines developed?

This article is part of a series of explainers on vaccine development and distribution. Learn more about vaccines – from how they work and how they’re made to ensuring safety and equitable access – in WHO’s Vaccines Explained series.

What are the ingredients in a vaccine?

Vaccines contain tiny fragments of the disease-causing organism or the blueprints for making the tiny fragments. They also contain other ingredients to keep the vaccine safe and effective. These latter ingredients are included in most vaccines and have been used for decades in billions of doses of vaccine.

Each vaccine component serves a specific purpose, and each ingredient is tested in the manufacturing process. All ingredients are tested for safety.

Antigen

All vaccines contain an active component (the antigen) which generates an immune response, or the blueprint for making the active component. The antigen may be a small part of the disease-causing organism, like a protein or sugar, or it may be the whole organism in a weakened or inactive form.

Vaccines topic 2 01 Vaccine Antigens

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How vaccines help

Vaccines contain weakened or inactive parts of a particular organism (antigen) that triggers an immune response within the body. Newer vaccines contain the blueprint for producing antigens rather than the antigen itself. Regardless of whether the vaccine is made up of the antigen itself or the blueprint so that the body will produce the antigen, this weakened version will not cause the disease in the person receiving the vaccine, but it will prompt their immune system to respond much as it would have on its first reaction to the actual pathogen.

Vaccines Antibody illustration 02_29 Oct

Some vaccines require multiple doses, given weeks or months apart. This is sometimes needed to allow for the production of long-lived antibodies and development of memory cells. In this way, the body is trained to fight the specific disease-causing organism, building up memory of the pathogen so as to rapidly fight it if and when exposed in the future.

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How do vaccines work?

 

This article is part of a series of explainers on vaccine development and distribution. Learn more about vaccines – from how they work and how they’re made to ensuring safety and equitable access – in WHO’s Vaccines Explained series.

Germs are all around us, both in our environment and in our bodies. When a person is susceptible and they encounter a harmful organism, it can lead to disease and death.

The body has many ways of defending itself against pathogens (disease-causing organisms). Skin, mucus, and cilia (microscopic hairs that move debris away from the lungs) all work as physical barriers to prevent pathogens from entering the body in the first place. 

When a pathogen does infect the body, our body’s defences, called the immune system, are triggered and the pathogen is attacked and destroyed or overcome.

The body’s natural response

A pathogen is a bacterium, virus, parasite or fungus that can cause disease within the body. Each pathogen is made up of several subparts, usually unique to that specific pathogen and the disease it causes. The subpart of a pathogen that causes the formation of antibodies is called an antigen. The antibodies produced in response to the pathogen’s antigen are an important part of the immune system. You can consider antibodies as the soldiers in your body’s defense system. Each antibody, or soldier, in our system is trained to recognize one specific antigen. We have thousands of different antibodies in our bodies. When the human body is exposed to an antigen for the first time, it takes time for the immune system to respond and produce antibodies specific to that antigen. 

In the meantime, the person is susceptible to becoming ill. 

Once the antigen-specific antibodies are produced, they work with the rest of the immune system to destroy the pathogen and stop the disease. Antibodies to one pathogen generally don’t protect against another pathogen except when two pathogens are very similar to each other, like cousins. Once the body produces antibodies in its primary response to an antigen, it also creates antibody-producing memory cells, which remain alive even after the pathogen is defeated by the antibodies. If the body is exposed to the same pathogen more than once, the antibody response is much faster and more effective than the first time around because the memory cells are at the ready to pump out antibodies against that antigen.

This means that if the person is exposed to the dangerous pathogen in the future, their immune system will be able to respond immediately, protecting against disease. 

Vaccines Antibody illustration 01_29 Oct

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WHO scientist could reportedly face DEATH PENALTY for attacking ivermectin and withholding effective treatment from patients

In India, an India Bar Association’s (IBA) lawsuit against World Health Organization (WHO) Chief Scientist of India Soumya Swaminathan continues to move forward, charging her with murder and other crimes that could result in life imprisonment or even the death penalty.

If you missed it, Swaminathan was served with a lawsuit back in May for her contributions to dissuading the use of ivermectin in the treatment of the Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19).

Swaminathan is accused of lying about ivermectin in an effort to keep it out of the hands of sick people. The IBA says Swaminathan’s words and behavior concerning ivermectin were “extremely unreasonable,” describing them as “having another purpose” besides trying to help people.

The IBA is calling for the invocation of articles 302, 304 (paragraph 2), and 88 of the Indian Penal Code against Swaminathan. Should she be convicted, Swaminathan could be put to death for her alleged crimes.

On May 25, the IBA issued a statement accusing Swaminathan of “initiating a false propaganda campaign against ivermectin” and “inducing the public to refuse to use ivermectin” to treat the Chinese Virus.

About two weeks prior to the suit, India’s Health Ministry approved an ivermectin-based Fauci Flu treatment regimen that recommended all residents 18 years of age and older take five ivermectin tablets daily. The stated purpose for this was to keep people from developing potentially fatal high fevers.

After the Health Ministry introduced the new policy, Swaminathan freaked out and issued a statement on behalf of the WHO claiming that the United Nations “public health” arm does not recommend the use of ivermectin in the treatment of Chinese Germs.

WHO’s “essential medications” list includes ivermectin

As it turns out, Swaminathan’s claim is false. The WHO actually does recommend the use of ivermectin in its “essential medications” list. The inventors of ivermectin were also awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2015 for developing the drug.

“Your misleading tweet against the use of ivermectin on May 10 this year led to the exclusion of ivermectin from the coronavirus treatment regimen in Tamil Nadu on May 11, despite the fact that this drug was previously a treatment on the drug list,” the IBA wrote in its legal statement against Swaminathan.

“The world has gradually realized that you use the ‘scientific method’ to describe fabricated facts. This method is absurd, arbitrary, and ridiculous. The WHO claims to be ‘omniscient,’ but this is like a vain emperor wearing his new clothes, and the whole world only now knows that the emperor is wearing no clothes at all.”

In a separate statement IBA legal team head Dipala Ojha promised that the legal statement against Swaminathan is “only the first step.” More is coming that aims to put her away for life, he threatened.

“The action of deleting the tweet just proved her maliciousness,” the IBA wrote on its website about Swaminathan’s attempted coverup of her actions. “Deleting this tweet will not save her and her colleagues. We will support citizens to initiate litigation for her criminal actions.”

In its own statement, the WHO responded that its members “regret” this alleged unprovoked attack on Swaminathan, who is regarded as a senior WHO official. Swaminathan has been with the WHO since March 2019.

It is exceptionally rare that high-level government officials ever get punished for something, so Swaminathan must have done something pretty threatening to now be targeted like this.

“The untrustworthy, unelected officials who advise against ivermectin are in ‘regulatory capture,’” wrote one commenter at Natural News. “This happens when the regulator (FDA / NIH / NHS etc.) is compromised by the corporations they are meant to regulate.”

More related news stories about Chinese Virus drama can be found at Pandemic.news.

Sources for this article include:

AmericasFrontlineDoctors.org

NaturalNews.com

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